Environmental Club is "Dying" to Decrease UO Carbon Emissions

Environmental Club is "Dying" to Decrease UO Carbon Emissions

Written by Becky Hoag

Photographed by Meg Matsuzaki

Members of the Climate Justice League staged a "Die-In" protest in the middle of University of Oregon's Erb Memorial Union building Thursday, February 22. From 11:20 to 11:45 am, black-clothed students lied down on the floor around the O shaped desk in the shape of a water droplet, which represented an oil drop. They framed the shape with signs that demanded UO to update and follow through with their Climate Action Plan (CAP).

Elliott State Forest: For Sale to Private Bidders

By Carl Segerstrom

– The Elliott State Forest is a public trust area home to numerous populations of endangered species

Salem, Ore.– On Oct. 11 over 100 people demonstrated against the pending sale of the Elliott State Forest at the Oregon Department of State Lands meeting.

The event was organized by Oregon environmental groups to show the State Land Board that citizens throughout the state oppose the sale of the Elliott to private interests.

Sacred Water: Native American tribes struggle to keep sacred lands and vital resources from the D.A.P.L

By Becky Hoag

The Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) is near functioning, breaking the hearts of many Native American tribes and environmental activists around the nation. Subsequently, protests erupted from NYC to LA. Even in Eugene, activist efforts are underway, as groups are urging people to boycott banks like Wells Fargo, which funded the pipeline.

‘The Blob’: Oregon’s Aquatic Godzilla

By Mara Welty

– “The Blob,” a warm patch of water that extends from Northern California to the Alaskan Coast has created abnormal weather conditions and continues to threaten marine ecosystems.

AN ANOMALY

The Pacific northwestern sardine industry is dead. Ever since a warm patch of water, nicknamed ‘The Blob’, appeared along the coast in 2013, fisheries have been struggling to stay open after a disruption in the marine food web.

Study: Oxygen Loss in Coos Bay

By Caley Eller

Climate change is a problem that the entire world faces, but it may impact Oregon sooner rather than later.

According to a University of Oregon study by UO assistant professor Dave Sutherland and based on research done by UO alumnus Molly A. O’Neill, the coastal city of Coos Bay, Oregon, could soon face drastic climate change-related changes to the ocean’s oxygen levels. The interesting part of the study, however, is that Coos Bay has long had oxygen levels that are higher than any other coastal region in the state.